Posted in Mirror, Mirror

7 Reasons to Date a Nerdy Girl: Response

First, I just want to say that I LOVE The Good Men Project. I think they are doing amazing work and the articles they post are informative and interesting. However, (everything before the but doesn’t count?) the other day I read this article: Smart is Sexy: 7 Reasons it’s to your benefit to date a nerdy girl, and I have to say, as a nerdy girl myself, I was kind of offended. So I decided to write a response. I’m going to write my reaction to the 7 reasons the author listed in the article. My own 7 reasons are listed below.

  1. Books are cheaper than jewelry: False. I don’t know where you live, author, but where I come from, books are not cheaper than jewelry. Certainly not science fiction or fantasy novels. Also, we ARE into jewelry. What about a Deathly Hallows ring or a TARDIS necklace? About a week after we started going out, my ex boyfriend bought me a pair of earrings with atoms on them. I was the happiest girl on Earth.
  2. Pillow talk is educational: False. Don’t fool yourself. We still need to feel secure in our relationship with you. So you’ll still get those questions, like “Does your mom like me?” It is true that sometimes pillow talk will involve graphs and vector spaces, but chances are, if you aren’t interested in us, we won’t waste our time trying to explain things.
  3. Celebrity crushes aren’t much of a threat: False. Shakespeare? Einstein? Not all nerdy girls are into old dead men, you know. But if you are a sane person, celebrity crushes shouldn’t be a threat in any relationship, regardless of whether your partner is nerdy or not.
  4. You don’t have to entertain her: False. Just because we enjoy reading doesn’t mean you can just ditch us on a Friday night. We want to be a good partner to you, so we’ll give you permission to go out with the guys, but that doesn’t mean we don’t want to go out with you. Besides, reading doesn’t have to be a solo activity. Cuddling and reading books together is one of our favorite activities.
  5. She provides you with topics for bar talk: True. But if you’re not already an interesting person to talk to on your own, guess what? You’re probably not going to get a second date.
  6. She’s likeable: True. We are f***ing awesome.
  7. You’re never bored: True. Unless you pretend to listen when we explain how the human Genome was discovered. Then you’re in trouble. But that thing about personality needing to win – that’s true for everyone. And if you’re shallow and only going for looks, best look somewhere else because we are probably not interested in you.

Now I’d like to share what I think are the actual reasons it is beneficial to date a nerdy girl. Reason #1: We’re not shallow Remember, girls like good-looking guys too. But we nerds are more interested in your hobbies, your interests, your personality. It’s great if you look good but we know that’s not all there is to you. As for us, we don’t overemphasize our own physical appearance. To a lot of guys that may seem off-putting. We’re not ugly, we don’t neglect ourselves. We just don’t necessarily need to put on make-up, or care too much if our socks match. We expect you to look beyond these things and be interested in who we are on the inside, and not just what we look like when we’re all dressed up. Reason #2: We’re into the same stuff you’re into. We like superhero comic books, gaming, sometimes we even enjoy talking about politics. We hate shopping trips. We’ll host the Star Wars marathon on May the 4th. It’s not all about shoes and nail polish for us. We are not intimidated by things which are considered boy interests. We won’t necessarily know all the rules of football, but we’re willing to learn. We want you to take an active interest in our hobbies, so we will in turn take an active interest in yours. Reason #3: We are amazing in bed. This is a well known secret of the nerd world. There are several theories which try to explain why this is. The one I like is that since we are so under-appreciated in our teens, we have a lot of time to read romance and erotica and watch porn (!OMG!). Just like anything else, we insist on educating ourselves about sex. We are constantly learning so we’re likely to want to try new things. There is also a huge overlap between the nerd world and the kink community. Don’t forget, we were into role-play before we even knew people did that. Reason #4: We come with life skills. We are insatiably curious, so we spend a lot of time learning random things. We might know how to hang shelves, light a fire, make ice cream from scratch, or build a computer from the floor up. We’re not damsels in distress, but this shouldn’t intimidate you. If you need to fix the sink to feel validated, we’ll happily step aside. Reason #5: We make responsible, informed decisions. Okay, not always. Sometimes we need to fly a kite with a key in a lightning storm. But hey, unprotected sex? Forget it. Reason #6: We are highly employable. It’s true that we are full of useless information, but we’re also full of useful knowledge. We get science or medical degrees. We can build websites or invent apps. We’re quick learners, so new skills a workplace requires don’t intimidate us. We don’t settle for the gas station. We reach for the stars, and sometimes we put a man on the moon. Reason #7: Why not? We’re girls. You’re into girls. Bring it.

from xkcd.com
Posted in Mirror, Mirror

Two Ways of Telling the Same Story

When I was in tenth grade I went to my first nerd science program at the Weizmann Institute. Our first lecture was about evolution. After the introduction, the lecturer addressed two friends and me and asked us whether we wanted to disagree with what he was teaching. He asked this because we all came from high schools which identify as religious, so naturally he assumed we believed in creation and therefore could not accept the Big Bang Theory. To his surprise, all three of us said no.

On the other hand, my eighth grade science teacher told my class that the chances that the big bang happened were the same as the chances of getting the Bible written by spilling a bottle of ink.

I know a lot of people who can’t reconcile the coexistence of both science and religion. I personally have never had a problem with it. I don’t think it’s necessary to choose between them. Let me explain why.

First, a little math (feel free to skip this paragraph, I promise I won’t go too deep). In math we have the concept of equivalence, where two things can be worth the same thing but not be the same. For example, 4+5 is equivalent to 9. While they clearly look different on the screen, they both return the same value – 9. Still, one is a sum, and the other is a natural number – not the same thing! But you can’t prove that they’re different. Because they’re not, really. They’re just two different representations of the same idea. 3 to the power of 2 is yet another way to represent the number 9. For another example, think about two triangles drawn on paper with the same size, same direction and same angles, but in different places. They’re not the same triangle, but you can’t really tell them apart.

So here’s my idea. Taking the first example from the previous paragraph, let’s use the number 9 to represent the concept of God. There are tons of different ways of approaching it. Everyone relates to it differently, everyone feels differently and imagines differently. But at the end of the day we’ve still reached the number 9.

I was talking to a friend of mine last week and we were discussing how fascinating we both find studying science. There are moments when you learn something new and it’s just mind blowing. What draws us to science are those moments when you feel like “OH MY GOD Nature is frickin’ awesome.” I felt this way when I first saw the proof that i squared equals -1. To get a taste of how awe-inspiring science can be, check out the double-slit experiment from quantum physics.

So scientists get a feeling of awe, and religious people experience spiritual uplifting. My argument is that these two concepts, like 4+5 and 9, are equivalent. Why is it necessary to distinguish between a sense of awe inspired by scientific study and a sense of awe inspired by prayer or belief? Further, is it even possible to distinguish between them? Can one really argue that these two “awes” are fundamentally different, and not just two ways of telling the same story?

You might want to argue that the creation and the big bang theory are contradictory, but I don’t think they are. I don’t see a reason to differentiate between God and the big bang. If you look carefully at Genesis 1, you’ll find that the days of creation line up very nicely with the theory of evolution. Professor Gerald Schroeder takes this idea even further and says that the age of the earth according to creation and according to science are the same!

Set aside for a moment all the traditions and scriptures and whys and hows. I’m not talking about the entire idea of practicing a religion, just about believing in God. When I see a magnificent proof in a math lecture at University, I experience the same kind of uplifting as I have in a moment of prayer, meditation, or creative inspiration. The sense of awe is what drives me to science, just like the sense of awe is what drives people to believe in God. What’s the difference between the double-slit experiment and a miracle? No difference, I think. Two ways of telling the same story.

Posted in Book Reviews

Book Review: The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Book
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

*SPOILER ALERT* Although the title might sound a little bit creepy, the graveyard is intimidating only if you have the misfortune to be one of the live human characters in the book. Generally, the ghosts who live in the graveyard are witty and hilarious. The living people are funny too. For example, here are the thoughts of one of the living characters, Scarlett Amber Perkins, when caught in a life threatening situation:

page 258. “If I get out of this alive, I’m going to force her [Mom] to get me a phone. It’s ridiculous. I’m the only person in my year who doesn’t have her own phone, practically.”

As always, Neil Gaiman grips the reader and doesn’t let go until he’s shaken your world completely. I could feel him walking through various graveyards checking to make sure there was a ghoul gate in every one of them, checking the inscriptions on the headstones imagining characters to life. His descriptions are so vivid that when Bod walks through his home, you are there with him. The characters earn the reader’s trust as they earn the trust of other characters, and when they betray them, they betray the reader.
There are things we think about when we think of a graveyard, of ghosts, of the dead. Things we aren’t sure about. These are the things Neil Gaiman takes and crafts masterfully into the world of the people of the graveyard.

page. 174. “Fear is contagious. You can catch it. Sometimes all it takes is for someone to say that they’re scared for the fear to become real.”

People who die leave an echo of themselves in the world of the living. The people in Neil Gaiman’s graveyard have the ability to access the world of the living in a way which is kind of an eerie explanation to that echo. They can fade – meaning, they can be present without being noticed. They can dreamwalk – enter people’s dreams and sometimes even create a dream. They can create fear and haunt. It is fascinating to question these experiences we have as living people, but through the eyes of the dead.

Characters
There are a few different kinds of creatures in the world: the living, the dead, and of course the most intriguing characters – the ones in between.
1. The protagonist – Bod, is a living boy, but he lives in the graveyard and therefore has the ability to do what the dead who live there can. In his reality the lines between living and dead are blurred, and his mind is so open he believes anything is possible.

page 167. “Someone killed my mother and father and my sister.”
“Yes. Someone did.”
“A man?”
“A man.”
“Which means,” said Bod, “you’re asking the wrong question.”…”the question isn’t ‘Who will keep me safe from him?’”
“No?”
“No. It’s ‘Who will keep him safe from me?’”

Bod’s abilities to behave like the dead come from him having the “Freedom of the Graveyard.” I think the Freedom of the Graveyard is the privilege given to those who have already died, thus been relieved of the fear of death. It is freedom from the fear of the unknown.

2. Silas, Bod’s guardian, is neither living nor dead, and it’s not entirely clear what he is, but here’s what we do know about him:

page 32: “I want to be like you,” said Bod, pushing out his lower lip. “No,” said Silas firmly, “you do not.”
page 194. “There are ways to kill people like me,” he said. “But they do not involve cars.”

3. The third intriguing character is the villian, the man Jack. While he is clearly alive, he also has some mysterious abilities which living people usually do not possess. The book opens with Jack committing a murder. His motive is not clarified until the very end, but he creates a kind of paradoxical cycle of events: if he had not tried to kill the boy in the first place, then his reason for wanting to kill him would not exist. It reminded me of two of my favorite pieces of literature: Harry Potter and Shakespeare’s Macbeth. If Lord Voldemort had not tried to kill Harry, he would not have created his own worst enemy. If the witches had not predicted that Macbeth would become king, he may not have tried.

There are also legends relating to the world of the graveyard, the ancient. The first, the Lady on the Grey, was so convincing I googled it to see if it was something I should have known about. The second, the legend of the treasure – the brooch, the goblet, the knife – was not entirely explained, but everyone in the world seemed to know about it. They did not, however, know about the Sleer – the guardians of the treasure. The sleer were a particularly interesting entity because you never knew exactly what they were. Whether the sleer is good or bad depends on what you want: power, or freedom.

The story is amazing, with such a shocking twist I actually gasped out loud while reading it. It says it’s a book for children, but come on – we all know the best books for grown ups are kids’ books.

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Posted in Mirror, Mirror

With Every Lesson Learned a Line Upon Your Beautiful Face

Once upon a time, Bella loved Edward because he was handsome. Then Edward left and Bella was worth nothing without him. Then Edward refused to have sex with her until they were married. Then he abused her and she was convinced it was all out of love. Then she got pregnant on their wedding night. Then he turned her into a vampire.

Among the many appalling messages the Twilight series has to give to young girls (Yay! A chance to take a stab at Twilight) is that the ideal woman is frozen in time at the age of nineteen so that she can remain attractive in the eyes of her partner. (For the record, the only reason I read the books is so I could complain about them on my blog.)

I have seen so many shockingly beautiful women walk into a clinic and get toxic chemicals injected into their faces, and then pay nauseating amounts of money for it. I never ask but I always wonder, are these women happier when they walk out of the clinic? Are they loved more? Are their lives better as a result of looking younger than they actually are?

Why these women do this is no secret. The media world has pretty much told us that women are not supposed to age (that link is from Beauty Redefined, another worthwhile blog to check out.) As it turns out, the beauty image affects women at every stage of life – from tiny girls who prefer thin dolls over curvy ones to middle aged women who run from their wrinkles at a heavy cost. Not only are we supposed to be thin, tall, hairless, fat-free, and white (but not too white!), we are also supposed to be 17. Doesn’t it sound a little far-fetched to expect women to live up to these standards? Isn’t it a little bit absurd to expect women to be “Forever 21?”

I’m perfectly aware that I’m only 22 years old and unqualified to judge women older than me for decisions they make about their appearance. However, I can say from the perspective of early-twenty-somethings that we are basically useless. We contribute virtually nothing to the world (with the possible exception of running the IDF.) We may look good but we did nothing to earn it, and in any case the beauty image is so powerful that we spend most of the time thinking we’re ugly. And yet, instead of carrying their years with pride, older women try to look like us. Instead of boasting their wisdom, they hide it. As if experience is something to be ashamed of – as if knowledge is an undesirable thing. These are the messages we young people receive about growing up.

I was walking to work the other day when I heard the song “Get Out the Map” by the Indigo Girls. This one line struck me:

“With every lesson learned a line upon your beautiful face.”

It says that lines on a person’s face are a result of being truly alive. They are an echo of experiences and lessons they’ve learned. Wrinkles are a physical expression of wisdom. The Indigo Girls go one step further and insist that the face these lines are etched upon remains beautiful.

When Gloria Steinem turned 50, a reporter commented that she looked much younger than her age, and she replied, “No, this is what fifty looks like.” Women are so used to lying about their age that we’ve forgotten that not only young people are beautiful. Let’s try not to forget that.

Posted in Book Reviews

Book Review: Akiva’s Orchard by Yochi Brandes

הפרדס של עקיבאהפרדס של עקיבא by Yochi Brandes

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is an important book if you are interested in Judaism or Jewish history, or Jewish. The main thing it does is takes the million Rabbis you’ve heard of and organizes them in your head: Who lives when, whose student is whom, where they taught, how they were related and how they interacted with each other. When reading about them in the scriptures these things are never clear, and one can easily get the illusion that they sit around a table and discuss things, although many of the characters at that table lived in different times. Each Rabbi is depicted as unique, so it is impossible after reading this book to forget who Rabbi Akiva studied with and who his students were.

Yochi Brandes takes the time period (70-135 A.D.) with its central characters and brings it to life. She reframes the famous stories we already knew, telling them from a different point of view or using her imagination to explain missing details. Because the stories are familiar, the book is engaging from the first page to the last, and often surprising when she presents a different view on a story you thought you knew. The language is not pure literary Hebrew (probably why I managed to read the book), it is diluted with references from the Bible and the Mishnah, so that famous phrases will jump out at you and often help you get deeper into a character’s mind by understanding what their situation reminds them of.

The book takes you on a journey through the lives of these beloved characters. Through their experiences the foundation of modern Judaism begins to bud. The author uses the lifestyles of the leaders of the time in order to critique the way we interpret Jewish laws today. For example, where the privilege of studying torah full time and not working was once reserved for the wealthy, today it is common for people to choose not to work and accept their poverty as a consequence. One rabbi may have emphatically objected to teaching Torah to women, but the fact that other rabbis in his own time taught their daughters teaches us that there was never a consensus on the matter, and no excuse for the concept that the Torah solely belongs to men. There is much conflict regarding the relationship which develops with Christianity, which was just beginning to blossom at the time and had not yet been declared its own religion, but it’s clear that while some rabbis believe they should be shunned, others believe that there is nothing more important than keeping peace with those who are different, whether or not they are Jewish. A main theme throughout the book is the changing of the Jewish religion – mainly the removal of God from the religion. You might be raising your eyebrows but truth be told, we don’t realize how much less the concept of God is present in our religion now than it was back then. The temple was still standing until 70 A.D. Prophets and miracles were common and accessible. The teachings of Rabbi Akiva were revolutionary in the way that they took the Torah from heaven and brought it down to earth, where it is now ours to interpret whichever way suits us best. The free interpretation is a controversial topic these days, but it is clear from the book that it shouldn’t be. According to Rabbi Akiva and his colleagues, we are allowed to understand it in our own way.

The book is told from the perspective of the famous Rabbi Akiva’s wife, Rachel. Jewish scriptures describe their loved her as passionate and romantic. They say that although they were poor, he promised to give her Jerusalem of Gold. We know that Rabbi Akiva leaves her for twelve years to study Torah. One sources says that at the end of twelve years he came home with a trail of thousands of students, and before he saw her, turned on his heels and returned for an additional twelve years. I was glad that this approach was not followed in the book. Brandes describes Akiva and Rachel’s relationship as romantic at first. Then Rachel begins to pressure her husband to travel to the Yeshiva and study torah, believing (correctly) that he is gifted. As a man who learned to read at age forty, Akiva begrudgingly leaves, swearing not to return until he becomes a Rabbi. This aspect of the relationship was difficult for me to swallow, because we see it so often in ultra-orthodox couples. Rachel is the image of the original ultra-orthodox woman, whose only wish is for her husband to study, and works around the clock to support her family on her own. Akiva is the original ultra-orthodox man, forswearing contact with women and immersing himself in his studies. The phrase often attributed to Rabbi Akiva, “Love your neighbor like yourself,” stands in contrast with many decisions his character makes in the book.

The ending is difficult, even for those who know how the lives of these Rabbis ended. It seems that the cruelty of the Roman Empire knows no limits. Each one of ten famous rabbis of the time died tortured, humiliating public deaths at the hands of the Romans (Jesus being nailed to a cross doesn’t even come close to what these guys went through). It seems like in the last chapter, the entire world turns upside down. The horrors are impossible to digest. Read it anyway.

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Posted in Mirror, Mirror

Why Math?

Q: Isn’t math boring?

A: Sometimes. As in any field of study, there are rough areas you have to plough through in order to get to the truly fascinating stuff. All the math which is taught through the end of high school is like that. They only teach the basics, the raw and often ugly tools you need in order to unlock the world of mathematics. For example, trigonometric identities are horribly tedious, but you have to know them well in order to understand why eiπ+1=0, which is unbelievable once you see it happen. Sal Khan says about that equation, “If this does not blow your mind you have no emotions.”

Q: Why mathematics?

A: Mathematics is the stuff my brain is made of. It’s not for everyone. I love the way everything connects and works out (assuming you solve the problem). The way the unit digits of square numbers create a palindrome. The way the prime numbers are the symbols of originality. The way everything in the world can be represented or explained by mathematics. There’s a kind of harmony to numbers which can only truly be seen if you dig deep enough. So that’s what I’m doing here. Digging deeper.

Q: Why not music?

A: Yoyo Ma, the world renowned cellist said about music that it is a discipline one never stops learning. Even if you don’t study with a teacher, you never stop learning. I’m playing in the university orchestra and of course I still sometimes do karaoke on the piano. I wanted music to remain something I do because I love it, and not because someone’s paying me. Neil Gaiman says he’s never regretted things he’s done for reasons other than money, but if you do something just for the money, and you don’t get the money, what do you have? It’s difficult to make a living as a professional musician, so I chose to have music in my life but not rely on it as a source of income. (I am not criticizing people who do! I ‘m just saying this was the choice I made.)

Q: What’s it good for?

A: Well, what is any BA good for? The reality these days is that a bachelor’s degree does not guarantee work. It also does not guarantee better pay, although hopefully, if you do get a job, it should allow you to be paid more. Assuming there are jobs available, the jobs you can get paid more for with a degree in mathematics are mostly in finance, business or High Tech. High Tech managers have noted that they would just as soon take a person with a degree in Mathematics as a person with a degree in computers.

Q: So you want to be a math teacher?

A: I’m sure I will find myself in education somewhere along the way, however, being a teacher is not my final destination. If all I wanted to do was teach math, I would not need a degree in math.

Q: What are your plans for the future?

A: I don’t know yet and that’s okay.

The Beauty of Boring Cello Parts

Johann Pachelbel is not the only composer who had a bad relationship with a cellist.

If you haven’t seen the Pachelbel rant, click on the link! It’s hilarious. He raises a good point about the Canon in D – it was written to torture cellists.

I’m also a cellist, and I’ve played the Canon in D. Cellists, let’s face it, it’s a gorgeous piece. I’ve heard of many ways of dealing with the dull cello line. One of them is to pass the melody between stands in shifts, while the other cellists simply fake it (air bow!). Personally, I used to change octaves, trill, and improvise until the condudtor caught my eye. 🙂 I’d like to discuss a few cello parts I find boring and repetative other than the Canon:

1) Antonio Vivaldi’s Four Seasons: Winter

In this piece, Vivaldi says, “Hey! Let’s see what happens if we give the cellos only one note to play for almost the entire piece!” In the first movement, we play F repeatedly 64 times and then eight breezy F sharps and G’s and then a lot of C’s. In the second movement, it’s B flat. I remember losing the feeling in my second finger at the end of this movement, which is a problem if you have to play the third movement immediately afterward, and I’ll explain why.

Here’s a link to the third movement of Vivaldi’s Winter concerto in the Four Seasons.

Pay close attention to the cello part. In the third movement. For the first 21 seconds, the cello plays an extended F. No rests, no other notes, just F (which is also played with 2nd finger). After that we change to a C which we play continually for 27 seconds. (Our long one note serenade is interrupted here to join the violins and play a scale.) We wait silently. On cue, we return to playing C for 11 seconds, after which we play an unending G for 16 seconds. Then we sit and wait while the violins play the sound of winter for a whole 45 seconds.

I won’t deny though that the ending of this piece is fun. Vivaldi leaves room for the cellos to express their frustration with the boring part by sawing the C string in half until the piece ends.

By the way, in The Four Seasons, there are entire movements in which the cellos are tacit (meaning they don’t play because Vivaldi didn’t feel like writing them a part.)

2) Benjamin Britten – Sentimental Sarabande 

It’s not hard to hear what’s going on in the cellos – because it doesn’t change until 41 seconds pass, when we get to play our first note other than G – A! and then B, C, all the way up to D! Whoa! For thirty seconds we get to play around a bit and then it’s right back to our ocatves – G…G! G…G! And it’s slow. Sentimental indeed. More like the Sleepy Sarabande in my opinion.

Any good teacher will tell you that a cello part is what you make of it. You can be the replacement for a metronome, as Mozart thought of us (in Quartet K157  and Eine Kleine Nachtmusik) or you can be the keystone that holds the whole orchestra together. But sometimes it’s important to just memorize your boring cello part quickly so you can do as the composer intended – sit back and just listen to the violins.

Posted in Mirror, Mirror

Perks of a Lousy Paying Job

For two months of my life I worked as a salesperson in a bookstore. Most of the work was lifting books and putting them in alphabetical order, placing prices tags or removing old sale stickers, organizing shelves so books didn’t fall over or cleaning up after inconsiderate customers. Once in a while someone would enter the store and then there was a new challenge: to squeeze as much money as possible out of this person by convincing him to buy everything you could possibly offer him.

I made 21.40 NIS per hour, which is roughly 5.4 US dollars. At 36 hours a week, it was enough to cover my rent, food, and have a bit left over for saving and spending. Because I had no experience or knowledge of how to be a proper employee, I was fired. But the two months I worked there were invaluable.

What are the perks of a lousy paying job, you might ask? Allow me to list a few:

  1. Learning how to sell. The three hours of instruction I received on how to sell the bookstore membership I learned skills I have used in every job I’ve had since, as well as the interviews. Sales tactics can be an advantage in many areas of life, beyond just selling your own things. Finding a new apartment, making friends, advertising, even making plans for the day. The ability to convince others, not necessarily against their will, is a great tool to have up your sleeve.

  2. Knowing book titles. In any social situation, if someone mentioned a book they were reading, I had read the back of it at work. I had not read most of them, but I knew what they were about and what kind of people were likely to buy them. I was able to hold intelligent conversations with friends for several minutes without letting on that I had never opened the book. Just knowing about it made me feel more educated, and gave me a platform for starting conversations with strangers. Even if you don’t work in a bookstore, knowing what the hottest products are has the same effect.

  3. Meeting lots of people. Nuff said.
  4. Understanding the sales industry. When I walk into a store, and someone offers to sell me a membership, or extra items, I know what’s going through their mind because I’ve been in that position. I knew that the 10% off everything she’s offering me is a white lie, and that if I don’t shop here frequently, it’s not going to pay off.

  5. Empathy for people with minimum wage jobs. When I’m standing in line at the café, and the girl behind the cash register enters the amount incorrectly, I don’t get upset because I know how confusing cash registers are. If I’m waiting at the doctor’s office and the secretary takes three phone calls and has three more on hold before she even looks at me, I’m patient because I know there is an idiot on the end of each line driving her crazy.

I think that experience working in these jobs has the potential to create better customers. I work as a secretary, and the worst customers are the ones who clearly didn’t have to work during college.